Pace victory in national policy

For most of us, monetary policy is terra incognita, the land that ancient cartographers knew existed, but didn’t know much about. Macroeconomics is not given much attention in high school curricula, so most freshmen arrive at college without understanding macroeconomics generally, and even less about monetary policy. Pace freshmen are no exception. The mystery of monetary policy extends far beyond the freshman year. Early in my career, I served as deputy assistant secretary for capital markets policy at the US Department of the Treasury, and I attended the monthly Treasury-Federal Reserve lunch with senior officials from both agencies. Let’s just say I was on a very steep learning curve.

Believing that this woeful gap needs to be filled, the Federal Reserve Board sponsors an annual competition for undergraduate economics teams to test their understanding of and facility with the major monetary policy issues facing the nation. The competition has two rounds: An initial round, run by five of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks; and a final, national championship round at the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, DC. Pace has had a team competing for approximately 10 years. In their first year, the Pace team placed 20th out of 35 teams in the New York Federal Reserve Bank’s initial round.

In 2012 and 2013, the Pace team came in first in the New York Fed’s initial round, besting students from fine economics departments at institutions like Cornell, Princeton, NYU, Hamilton, and others. In the national competitions, Pace placed third in the whole nation both years—which I regarded as a hugely impressive accomplishment.

This year, the Pace team again won the New York Federal Reserve Bank’s first round, and then was awarded first place in Washington, DC, besting teams from Princeton, University of Chicago, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Bentley University. Three Pace team members suffered significant health issues before and during the competition—yet several judges at the Federal Reserve Board said that the Pace presentation was one of the best presentations they had ever seen.

The Pace team’s championship is an extraordinary accomplishment. The team members are smart, but so was their competition. More than smarts is required for success at this level. Their victory is a testament to the team’s hard work and total commitment to mastering this complex area and the many conflicting policy considerations that attend each decision of the Federal Reserve Board and its Open Market Committee. It also bespeaks a tremendous amount of hard work and commitment by the team’s formidable coaches, professors Mark Weinstock; Gregory Colman, PhD; and Anna Shostya, PhD; as well as Department Chair Professor Joseph Morreale, PhD. The members of the team have our great admiration: Dyson College Economics majors Kelsey Berro (co-captain), Jordan Jhamb (co-captain), Julia Mikhailova, Katherine Craig, Lauren Price, and Daniella Gambino.

The team’s victory is so much more than simply coming in first in a very challenging competition. It is a graphic demonstration of the fact that Pace students, with the kind of superb leadership that our talented faculty coaches provided, can compete on equal terms with the best students in America—and win. We are very proud of all of them.