NYC Chancellor Carmen Fariña visits Pace University’s Inside Track

If you’re curious about the education issues shaping New York City’s future leaders and professionals, you won’t want to miss our upcoming InsideTrack with New York City Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña. Our program begins 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 16, in the Schimmel Center at 3 Spruce Street.

As the Chancellor of New York City Schools, Chancellor Fariña oversees the education of more than one million students, so her priorities and decisions related to key issues such as charter schools, Common Core, class size, teacher evaluations, and technology will impact the City for years to come.

We’ll talk about these topics and more with the Chancellor. Her 40 years of experience as a teacher, principal, district superintendent, region superintendent, Deputy Chancellor, and—since 2014—Chancellor gives her a well-rounded perspective as she works to provide New York City children with a quality education.

Whether you are a teacher, student, parent, or community leader, or you see yourself in one of these roles in the future, please join us for a discussion of issues that will reverberate far and wide into the future.

The Pace Community is a Remarkable Group

Pace’s Giving Tuesday campaign was a huge success, thanks to the commitment and generosity of our entire Pace Community. Given the campaign’s success, please allow me to proclaim today “Thank You Thursday” so we can properly recognize the donors—alumni, faculty, staff, students, and others who helped make this past Tuesday such a memorable day for the University.

Our Giving Tuesday contributions set a record. We raised over $100,000 in one day. That’s a marvelous achievement. Even better, these and other contributions we receive through the end of the year will be matched by our Trustees up to $220,000.

Our Pace Community is a big source of strength for the University. These dedicated, caring individuals support us through their gifts and they routinely enhance our academic programs and our students’ University experience. Many become Pace University ambassadors as they assume leadership positions in business, government, the arts, and non-profit worlds. What this University is today, and what it will become, is driven by the Pace Community.

Thanks to all of you for your ongoing dedication and support of Pace.

Connecting with members of our Pace Network

Outside of the New York City area, more Pace alumni reside in Florida, California and China than in any other locations. On our recent trip to Florida, Jennifer Bernstein, VP for Development and Alumni Relations, and I met with alumni who care deeply about Pace and support the University and our students in a variety of ways.

Brian Smith, who graduated from Pace with an MBA in 2000, is a senior managing director of First Republic Bank in Palm Beach and is very enthusiastic about Pace. Brian hosted a lunch for us with about ten wonderful Lubin and Dyson alumni and parents from the Palm Beach area. We had a fascinating discussion. Everyone was interested in hearing more about the Pace Path and curricular initiatives. The lunch was also a good opportunity for alumni to connect. Their interest in learning more about each other and exchanging ideas and information reinforced my belief in the importance of the Pace Network. Staying connected to Pace and other alumni has many benefits throughout life.

That evening we had a delightful dinner with Professor Harvey Stein and his wife Shirley, who graduated from Pace with an MBA in 1981. Harvey taught accounting as a full-time faculty member for 15 years. He was a practicing accountant and lawyer at the same time. Harvey describes his time at Pace as “among his most rewarding.” Harvey retired from Pace in 1984 to build Pencil Pushers United, Inc., one of the first successful computer-driven tax form preparation programs for professionals. In a wonderful example of the power of a Pace MBA, Shirley went back to school at Pace for that degree and served as President of the company. The Steins sold the company in 1998 and retired to Florida. Harvey then established a scholarship for an accounting student at Pace and recently funded $100,000 to name a classroom in Alumni Hall, a new residence hall being built in Pleasantville.

The next morning we had breakfast with John and Carol Anne Stiglmeier and their son Jack. John and Carol Anne are the parents of Fairleigh, a sophomore who is majoring in women’s and gender studies in Dyson. Jack is following his sister to Pace and will start in the fall as a freshman in the new BFA in Acting for Film, Television, Voice-Overs, and Commercials. John and Carol Anne (who has an impressive background in curricular planning for K-12 education) will introduce us to the secondary school acting network in South Florida. They are a terrific example of the increasingly active and involved Pace parents.

Jennifer and I ended our visit with a long and very productive lunch the next day with Peter Sacripanti, a Pace Law School alumnus who is the CEO of McDermott Will & Emery, a large and successful international law firm.

In selected areas like Florida, California, and China, there are significant needs for a senior Pace administrator, dean and/or faculty member to visit every year. When we solidify the relationships of alumni with both the University and with each other, we leverage the full power of our Pace Network.

Pace alumni stay connected

The members of the Pace Network of successful thinking professionals care a great deal about Pace University. They’ve got great ideas how we can enhance the University experience for today’s students. Many are also interested supporting students directly—through mentoring, referrals, scholarships, and other creative opportunities. We try and get out and meet with alumni as often as possible.

Recently Jennifer Bernstein, VP for Development and Alumni Relations, and I connected with alumni, friends, and parents of current students in Florida. As always, I was struck by the important role that the University played in the lives of so many of them. Everyone was delighted when I told them how we are modernizing our New York City and Pleasantville locations. They were also very enthusiastic about the “Pace Path” because it is the modern manifestation of Pace’s historic commitment to graduate students who are ready to function as real professionals. 

I met with Don Boudreau during the trip. Don graduated from Pace with a BBA in Marketing in 1970. He rose to become Vice Chairman of JP Morgan Chase and served as a University Trustee for years. Don and his family established two endowed scholarships at Pace. He is now Trustee Emeritus, and remains deeply interested in the future of Pace. In fact, following our conversation in Florida, Don informed me that he intends to give $250,000 to the Campaign for Pleasantville. In recognition of this extraordinary generosity, we will dedicate the Susan and Donald Boudreau Student Lounge in our newly renovated Kessel Student Center in Pleasantville. Don’s life and career is a wonderful example to our students, and I am so pleased that his name will have such a prominent place on our campus for years to come.  

I also saw friends of Pace, Ellen Kramer and her husband Arthur Keyser. Both of them are active in the theater in Sarasota and elsewhere. Ellen studied theatrical lighting design in the early 80s with Chris Thomas, former Chair and Professor of Performing Arts. She established a scholarship for lighting and theatrical design students in his memory. Arthur was a successful Philadelphia lawyer and, when they retired to Florida, he began a new career as a serious playwright at the age of 80. Arthur’s work continues to be published and performed in Florida and elsewhere.

I am very proud that so many Pace students, alumni, and friends compete successfully with the best students from the best schools in America and rise to the highest levels within their professions. Don and Ellen are just two examples from our vast Pace Network who not only achieved their dreams, but who help current students achieve their dreams as well. 

More on this trip in my next post.