Finding your passion is not a one size fits all exercise

“Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

That’s great advice. It may surprise you to learn, however, that the person who made the suggestion isn’t a professor, career counselor, or anyone with knowledge of what it takes to succeed in our constantly changing, 21st century, technology-driven world. Confucius, the Chinese philosopher who lived approximately 2,500 years ago, uttered those words at a time when jobs looked much different than the careers people have today.

The concept of being passionate about your work, however, is as fresh today as it was in Confucius’ time.

How do people find their passion? Some people find their passion very early in life. Our School of Performing Arts students probably have been practicing their Oscar acceptance speeches in front of the bathroom mirror since they were children. Others must search for their passion.

Most of us find our passions as our horizons expand. We try new things, read up on new subjects, and talk with people from diverse backgrounds. Some people, like me, have different passions at different times in their lives.

Finding your passion sometimes means you’ll explore new roads for exploration’s sake—without knowing where the road goes.

Albert Einstein’s passion for inquiry made him the most influential scientist of the 20th century. In 1917, Einstein wrote a paper called “The Stimulated Emission of Radiation.” Einstein’s paper became the foundation of a new technology called “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emissions of Radiation.” Perhaps you are more familiar with the technology’s acronym, LASER. Today lasers are used in eye surgery, tattoo removal, to scan barcodes in supermarkets and departments stores, for data storage, and in electronic devices like DVD players. Multiple multi-billion dollar industries were born—all because of Einstein’s passion for inquiry.

If you see something that interests you, explore it, no matter what your age or position in life. You never know where a new-found passion will lead.

1 thought on “Finding your passion is not a one size fits all exercise”

  1. I am certain that the above post would have been endorsed with enthusiasm by Joseph Campbell who has preached to: ““Follow your bliss. If you do follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track
    that has been there all the while waiting for you, and the life you ought to be living is the one you are living. When you can see that,
    you begin to meet people who are in the field of your bliss,
    and they open the doors to you. I say, follow your bliss and don’t be afraid, and doors will open where you didn’t know they were going to be. If you follow your bliss, doors will open for you that wouldn’t have opened for anyone else.” Thanks for such an inspirational message.

Comments are closed.