Feed on
Posts
Comments

Finish in Four

The number “four” pops up a lot in our everyday lives.

There are four seasons—spring, summer, autumn, and winter. There are four directions—east, west, north, and south. There are four books in Islam, and the Four Noble Truths express the basic orientation of Buddhism. In Christianity the four-point star, or the Star of Bethlehem, represents both Jesus’ birth and the purpose for which he was born, and children ask the four questions at the Passover Seder. In professional baseball, basketball, and hockey, teams must win four games out of seven to be crowned champions.

In numerology, the number “four” is defined as disciplined, strong, hard-working, and conscientious. These four adjectives describe Pace students.

Now the number “four” is more prominent on our Pace campuses. We kicked off our Finish in Four campaign at the start of this semester. We handed out flyers during Orientation and hung posters on both campuses. There’s also a new video on the way. The campaign supports Provost Sukhatme’s goal to have students graduate from Pace in four years or less.

There are all sorts of advantages for students to finish in four. For one thing, students who graduate in four years pay less than students who delay graduation. In addition, lower costs often translate to lower student debt. Students who finish in four can also begin their careers faster—which mean becoming economically independent and self-sufficient. Most important, however, students who commit to finishing in four years are more likely to complete their degrees than students who plan on taking longer to graduate.

Graduating in four years may not be for everyone. Some students who work and attend school at the same time, for example, may not be able to commit to Finish in Four schedules. But students who do commit to graduating in four years or less do not have to sacrifice their undergraduate experiences to do it. These students are still afforded every opportunity Pace has to offer—including access to internships, study abroad programs, honor societies, student activities, and leadership opportunities.

Finishing in four isn’t difficult—it just takes the commitment, dedication, and hard work Pace students are known for, combined with the thoughtful planning they do with their advisers. Pace faculty and staff are very supportive of this initiative and there is no doubt in my mind that once our students commit to Finish in Four, they’ll do it!

In a few days we’ll cut the ribbon and officially open the expanded Kessel Student Center. Since we are rebuilding approximately half the campus, there will be more ribbon cutting ceremonies in the months ahead. Slowly but surely, student life and bustle—rather than construction—is becoming the most visible activity on campus.

I’ve recently toured the campus and it’s very exciting to see the construction sites shrink and our renewed campus take shape. The expanded Kessel Center has more room for student activities and meetings, as well as dining, and is once again teeming with student life. We still need to do some landscaping and, when the weather gets better, we will plant grass, shrubs and trees. By summer Kessel will look like a Pace postcard.

I’m also very excited that work on the Environmental Center is just about finished. Students are using the new classroom and we completed many of the site improvements last fall. All that’s left is to finish the new farmhouse, and we hope to have that completed soon.

Construction on Alumni Hall continues. The first of two new residence halls under construction, Alumni Hall will open for business in time for the fall semester. Work on the new athletic facilities is also progressing. The baseball field is ready for its new surface. Once the weather improves, we will put down a new artificial turf field for football and other sports. We are also putting the finishing touches on a new lecture hall in Willcox Hall. Students will begin using the new space next semester.

Other new facilities are already open. Students in our media arts and communications program started working on a new sound stage in Willcox last fall. We also replaced the old sculpture studio in Paton House with a new one in the Art Barn and added an additional classroom in Paton House. These new spaces also opened last semester.

The renewal of our Pleasantville campus has many advantages. Once construction of Alumni Hall is complete, we will relocate many students from Briarcliff to Pleasantville and all students will benefit from enhanced academic and social programs. We’re creating more green space for students to enjoy, and our new living learning communities in the residence halls will help us inject academics deeper into student life.

Most of all, however, our physical renewal in Pleasantville will lead to greater interest in, and growth of, our academic programs. We’ve seen it before. When we renovated the science labs in Pleasantville, enrollment in our science programs went up. When we created a new state-of-the-art home at 140 William Street in New York City for our performing arts program, enrollment jumped and our ability to recruit and retain high-quality faculty members also improved. We expect the same result in Pleasantville from this major project.

Former UK Prime Minister Winston Churchill once said, “We shape our buildings, thereafter they shape us.” No doubt our new and improved facilities in Pleasantville will help shape students for many years to come.

Years ago, Toyota penetrated the North American automobile market by producing a car that consumers had been asking for, but still couldn’t get—a small, fuel-efficient car that met people’s basic transportation needs. Toyota not only created the car, they produced a memorable advertising campaign to go with it. Toyota’s slogan, “You asked for it, you got it, Toyota,” permeated media for a decade.

Toyota’s advertisements from that period are old fashioned today, but there is nothing dated about soliciting accurate, balanced, and worthwhile information from people, and then acting on the feedback to improve their experience.

That’s the concept behind Pace’s new “You Asked, We Acted” campaign. The program’s goal is to ensure students have a greater voice in their college experience and, ultimately, in their own success.

At Pace, our mission never changes. We help students become thinking professionals through a mix of liberal education, professional preparation, and real world experiences. But Pace students come from diverse geographic, ethnic, and economic backgrounds. They also have different high school experiences and ability levels. What better way to ensure each student gets the most out of his or her college experience than to ask how we can make the experience more valuable?

Of course, we can’t say “Yes” to every idea, and we are already working to address some issues students brought to our attention. But when students recently suggested better training related to on-campus employment, Pace’s Organizational Learning and Development Department and the Office of Student Affairs created a training program for both student employees and supervisors of student employees. They are piloting the program this semester.

Students also suggested more information on majors, minors, and combined degree programs. We acted with the Majors Series. The Majors Series highlights Pace’s various academic programs and related career opportunities.

The list goes on. From requests for online and remote math placement exams, to more first semester course choice flexibility, enhanced financial aid information, and more student relaxation spaces, we’re listening and acting to improve our students’ Pace experience.

This week the University kicks off a six-week campaign that highlights many of our students’ suggestions and the steps Pace is taking to implement their ideas. There will be “You Asked, We Acted” posters on both campuses and we’ll use other media to share our students’ good ideas. Best of all, the Student Experience Action Team will continue to take our students’ suggestions at youasked@pace.edu. Please get in touch!

For most of us, monetary policy is terra incognita, the land that ancient cartographers knew existed, but didn’t know much about. Macroeconomics is not given much attention in high school curricula, so most freshmen arrive at college without understanding macroeconomics generally, and even less about monetary policy. Pace freshmen are no exception. The mystery of monetary policy extends far beyond the freshman year. Early in my career, I served as deputy assistant secretary for capital markets policy at the US Department of the Treasury, and I attended the monthly Treasury-Federal Reserve lunch with senior officials from both agencies. Let’s just say I was on a very steep learning curve.

Believing that this woeful gap needs to be filled, the Federal Reserve Board sponsors an annual competition for undergraduate economics teams to test their understanding of and facility with the major monetary policy issues facing the nation. The competition has two rounds: An initial round, run by five of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks; and a final, national championship round at the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, DC. Pace has had a team competing for approximately 10 years. In their first year, the Pace team placed 20th out of 35 teams in the New York Federal Reserve Bank’s initial round.

In 2012 and 2013, the Pace team came in first in the New York Fed’s initial round, besting students from fine economics departments at institutions like Cornell, Princeton, NYU, Hamilton, and others. In the national competitions, Pace placed third in the whole nation both years—which I regarded as a hugely impressive accomplishment.

This year, the Pace team again won the New York Federal Reserve Bank’s first round, and then was awarded first place in Washington, DC, besting teams from Princeton, University of Chicago, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Bentley University. Three Pace team members suffered significant health issues before and during the competition—yet several judges at the Federal Reserve Board said that the Pace presentation was one of the best presentations they had ever seen.

The Pace team’s championship is an extraordinary accomplishment. The team members are smart, but so was their competition. More than smarts is required for success at this level. Their victory is a testament to the team’s hard work and total commitment to mastering this complex area and the many conflicting policy considerations that attend each decision of the Federal Reserve Board and its Open Market Committee. It also bespeaks a tremendous amount of hard work and commitment by the team’s formidable coaches, professors Mark Weinstock; Gregory Colman, PhD; and Anna Shostya, PhD; as well as Department Chair Professor Joseph Morreale, PhD. The members of the team have our great admiration: Dyson College Economics majors Kelsey Berro (co-captain), Jordan Jhamb (co-captain), Julia Mikhailova, Katherine Craig, Lauren Price, and Daniella Gambino.

The team’s victory is so much more than simply coming in first in a very challenging competition. It is a graphic demonstration of the fact that Pace students, with the kind of superb leadership that our talented faculty coaches provided, can compete on equal terms with the best students in America—and win. We are very proud of all of them.

A few weeks ago, I accompanied two of our students to a small reception for The Kevin Spacey Foundation (KSF): America.

The event was hosted by business leader and philanthropist Adrienne Arsht at her splendid house in Washington D.C. to thank some of the larger supporters of a concert for Mr. Spacey’s global foundation. Adrienne is a wonderfully generous patron of the performing arts (e.g., the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami). Adrienne and I also served together on the Board of the American Ballet Theatre many years ago.

The KSF sponsors the creation of new works, designs, and tailored educational opportunities through KSF Learning. The Foundation also offers scholarships. We were very proud that the first five scholarships in the U.S. were awarded to Pace Performing Arts students. The two sophomore scholars, Larissa Jeanniton and Nicholas Delgado, were invited to the reception.

It was a lovely evening with an interesting group of people. Both Adrienne and Kevin Spacey spoke movingly about the Foundation’s important work. Among the highlights for me and for many of the people there was Larissa and Nicholas’ maturity, charisma, and dedication to their art.  I was very proud of them and their representation of Pace and its students.

For Larissa and Nicholas there is no doubt that the highlight of the evening was when Kevin Spacey took them aside to talk to them and give them advice about their careers as performing artists. He talked with them for some time, and had we not had a plane to catch, the conversation would have continued. As you can see from the photo below, his interest in them and their careers was genuine and very inspiring.

Kevin Spacey Pic

First there was Black Friday. Large retailers co-opted the day after Thanksgiving to kick off the holiday shopping season. Small mom and pop retailers weren’t about to be left out. They proclaimed the third day of the four-day weekend as Small Business Saturday in the hopes of drawing shoppers to their stores. Online retailers followed suit, electing the following Monday as Cyber Monday to push their products and sales. Even shippers had their own day—Free Shipping Thursday on the final Thursday before Christmas.

The holidays are behind us, but with so much focus on shopping and sales each holiday season, let’s applaud the United Nations Foundation and New York City’s 92nd Street Y for creating Giving Tuesday in 2012. The two groups created Giving Tuesday in response to the overemphasis on consumerism during the holidays. The day has its roots in the Bible verse, “It is more blessed to give than to receive.”

I am enormously proud of the way our Pace family members embraced Giving Tuesday this year. After raising approximately $13,000 in 2013, we set a Giving Tuesday goal of $25,000 for 2014. A generous alumnus had agreed to match contributions up to $25,000, so we hoped to meet our goal and raise $50,000.

Thanks to the spirit and generosity of our Pace friends, alumni, and supporters, we met our goal by the afternoon. By the end of the day, almost 300 donors contributed more than $76,000—providing the University with a total of $101,700 to support things like curriculum development, scholarship programs, and student activities.

Even after the holidays, it is appropriate to give thanks. At Pace we are thankful for everyone who recognizes that the United States cannot succeed in an increasingly complex and interconnected world unless the great middle class of students—not just students from the most selective colleges in America—receive first-class educations that combine high-quality classroom instruction with real world experience. Pace educates these students every day and they go on to fulfill their promise and potential. We are thankful for the support of our friends and extended Pace family members whose generous gifts allow us to help these hardworking young men and women achieve their dreams.

My warm wishes to you for a happy, healthy, and successful year as we begin 2015.

Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, and Rumain Brisbon never knew each other. Garner called Staten Island, New York, home. Rice lived in Cleveland, Ohio; Brown hailed from Ferguson, Missouri; and Brisbon came from Phoenix, Arizona. Yet despite the distance between them, their names will be forever linked as the four unarmed African American males whose lives were cut short during the latter half of 2014. That their deaths were senseless and tragic there is no doubt. And there is also no doubt about the need to improve the tense, stressful relationships between many police departments and the communities of color they serve. We cannot be satisfied with a society in which African American mothers and fathers fear the simple act of their sons walking down the street.

Deep and vigorous discussions of these issues are good ones. Questions need to be asked, and peaceful protests can emphasize to officials the seriousness of these discussions. No other unarmed African American males, or anyone else, should die needlessly. All lives matter.

Remember that the legacies of Garner, Rice, Brown, and Brisbon are more than instruments of social change. They were fathers, sons, and brothers. Their deaths left dreams unfulfilled and huge empty spaces in the lives of the people who loved them. Those spaces will never be filled.

Remember, too, that police departments and the officers who comprise them are not single, monolithic entities. In every police department, there are officers who excel at their jobs and others who are unsuited for the work. There are officers who are hailed as heroes for risking their lives to save others one day and who are condemned for split-second, life or death decisions the next day. Let’s never draw conclusions without all the facts.

Finally, remember that, while discussions about race relations are good, there is so much more to accomplish. I was a young lawyer working in Washington, D.C., during the 1960s and was one of the 250,000 people on the Washington Mall in August, 1963 when Dr. Martin Luther King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. That day, Dr. King reminded us that it had been 100 years since President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, but there was still work to do before anyone was truly free. Fifty one years later, the killing of four unarmed, African American males at the hands of the police in the last six months is proof there is still much work to do.

Colleges, states, students, administrators, and the White House are reexamining what more everyone can do to prevent sexual assaults and to assure campus safety. We must take additional steps to curb this growing national epidemic.

According to some studies, 20–25 percent of college women will be sexually assaulted during their college careers. Another approximately two percent of college men will be sexually assaulted – and many researchers believe sexual assaults on men are grossly underreported. Among college women, nine out of 10 knew their attacker.

At Pace, we are absolutely committed to preventing sexual assaults and addressing these situations promptly and appropriately when they do occur. It is one of our highest priorities. Every student deserves to pursue her or his dreams in a safe learning environment. We are reexamining our policies and procedures to make sure that students, whether they are in class or visiting friends on campus, feel secure and protected.

Last month the White House launched a campaign called “It’s on Us” to enlist communities in the fight against campus sexual violence. President Obama and Vice President Biden called on students to help keep their friends safe. “One of the most effective ways to prevent rape is to mobilize men and women on campus to join together in stopping perpetrators before they can commit a crime,” said Scott Berkowitz, the president and founder of an advocacy group partnering with the White House on the campaign.

The reviews that are underway at Pace will provide a number of occasions for us to engage in open dialogues about the circumstances that lead to unwanted sexual activities and what everyone can do to combat a complex problem that is far too big for any one person to tackle alone.

Bo’s story

I often talk about the amazing stories at Pace University. These stories recount victories of exceptional students and teams of students, highlight the accomplishments of our well-respected faculty, and demonstrate the heart of our University—like when everyone pulled together after Superstorm Sandy.

Then there is Bo’s story. It is a story that embodies the best elements of all our other stories combined. Bo’s story reminds us that Pace is a very special place, made up of very special people.

Nine years ago, 10-year-old Robert “Bo” Jones was diagnosed with Medulloblastoma—a form of brain cancer. The little boy that loved to run and lift weights underwent surgery to remove tumors. He endured radiation, chemotherapy, and more doctors’ visits and tests than most adults face in a lifetime.

During Bo’s ordeal his mother introduced him to Make-A-Wish—the national organization that grants wishes for children diagnosed with life-threatening medical conditions. While most kids wish for a trip to Disney World or to meet their favorite celebrity, Bo, who was then a teenager and in remission, wished for one year of strength and conditioning workouts with a Pace athletics trainer.

“I was struck by his determination,” Mike Bohlander, Pace’s strength and conditioning coach said. “He could have had anything with his wish. But he chose to come to Pace three days a week for one year and have me push him to improve his cardio and strength fitness. He had a plan and it was a pleasure to help him.”

Bo said he had wanted to attend Pace since high school, and his plan was to build himself up before his freshman year. Bo accomplished both goals. He started at Pace in Pleasantville earlier this month. He’s an education major. He’s also a Make-A-Wish volunteer. Best of all, Bo remains cancer-free.

Coach Bohlander said he still works with Bo, but Bo knows what he wants to accomplish and doesn’t need anyone’s help. “Bo inspires me,” he said. “The amount of progress he made in a short amount of time was truly remarkable. You can’t teach desire, and every day I work with him I get to see him accomplish something new.”

As I said, there are many amazing stories at Pace. I think one reason we have so many great stories is because our students, faculty, and staff support and care about each other. I also believe that the very special qualities that everyone brings to Pace will lead to more great stories in the future. I just have a feeling, however, that it will be difficult to top Bo’s story.

So many exciting things are happening at Pace this year. There is a wonderful renewal taking place and we’re making great progress in a challenging environment.

It’s not easy to convey the excitement and pride many of us feel about Pace’s future in a post, so I put together a short video that updates you on our progress and plans for the future. You can access it by clicking here.

As you watch the video, I hope you’re as proud of our progress as I am. We are renewing a great University that will help current and future students succeed for many years to come.

Older Posts »